Planespot.com: travel reports home  E-mail us    
 
:: Visit reports ::
» Aeroseum aviation museum, Gothenburg, Sweden
» Tartu aviation museum, Estonia
» Glider soaring, Ridali, Estonia
» Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles Airport
» Smithsonian's National Air and Space museum, Washington DC
» London Science Museum
» Riga aviation museum
» RAF Waddington Air Show 2008
» Goodwood Festival of Speed, United Kingdom
» Duxford IWM, United Kingdom
» Flying Legends air show 2008, United Kingdom
» London Imperial War Museum, United Kingdom
» Prague Kbely, Czech Republic
» Old Aeroplane Company, VIC, Australia
» Ansett Transport Museum, VIC, Australia
» new! War Memorial, ACT, Australia
» new! Canberra NASA Deep Space Communication Complex, ACT, Australia


:: Visit photos ::
» Aeroseum, Gothenburg
» Glider soaring, Ridali
» Tartu aviation museum
» Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center
» Smithsonian's National Air and Space museum, Washington DC
» London Science Museum
» Riga aviation museum
» RAF Waddington Air Show 2008
» Goodwood Festival of Speed, United Kingdom
» Duxford IWM, United Kingdom
» Flying Legends air show 2008, United Kingdom
» London Imperial War Museum, United Kingdom
» Prague Kbely, Czech Republic
» Old Aeroplane Company, Australia
» Ansett Transport Museum, Australia
» War Memorial, Australia
» Canberra NASA Deep Space Communication Complex, Australia

:: Book reviews ::
» Visions of a Flying Machine

:: Other ::
» Links
» RSS feed 
» Main Page 


:: London Science Museum ::

Spitfire at the London Aviation Museum Flight exhibit

Walking northwards from the South Kensington tube station, I was first greeted by the huge London Natural History Museum (and made a mental note to visit it in the future). Just around the corner is the London Science Museum.

Just before stepping into the museum, I had an eerie anticipation. With one of our main international offices being in London, Lilienthal's glider at the London Science MuseumI have made my way to the city well over ten times. But during all of these visits I never got beyond the airport-office-hotel triangle. Except for the late night pub and restaurant tours, of course. Gripping the handle, I knew that I had broken out of that particular spell - I had overcome the unfriendly nature of museum opening hours towards business travelers.

Being first greeted by a security guard reminded myself of the museums in Washington, but the check was more casual. The gift shop had tons of exciting memorabilia, gadgets and puzzles. But what came beyond that was a lot more exciting - the museum itself.

There were groups of young girls and boys who found the museum to be very agreeable. For me personally, there were moments of recognition in item after item. Things that captured the imagination or transformed the world in their own day. Let them be giant steam engines that revolutionized the safety of mining before proceeding to change the face of transportation and manufacturing forever. Or fabric looms that clothed Europe and later became the foundation of early computers. Not to mention Miss England and other competition craft that inspired many generations of British engineers.

It sadly was a Friday and I had to catch a plane back to Estonia in just a few hours. I rushed onwards through some exhibitions with determination to come back for a more thorough look.

Speaking of aviation, there are two floors dedicated to space and aviation. Among the space exhibits were the Sputnik, Apollo lunar lander (that I had already seen in the Air and Space museum) and Apollo capsule. A V-2 rocket and the XG900 plane stood next to each other in the main gallery. The first one was Hitler's wonder weapon that the British government managed to keep from the London public for quite a while despite several hits. The latter one was one of the first successful VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) testbed that later gave learnings to the building of the Harrier.

The Flight gallery featured planes such as the Antoinette monoplane, Lilienthal's glider, Wright Flyer's repo, the Roe Triplane and from the more modern era a Spitfire, cross-section of a jumbo, a glider, Learjet and many more. A cross-section of the V-1, putting the internals on display, was interesting and the selection of engines was impressive. Attracting a flock of kids were several simulators (though the experience cost extra).

Right now I'm torn between whether to go for a more in-depth visit the next time or check out London's other attractions.

Location: Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2DD, England, United Kingdom

Further information:
- My London Science Museum photos
- London Science Museum aviation, unofficial list of planes
- London Science Museum, official page

Steam engine at the London Science Museum


View Larger Map

 

 

E-mail me

copyright 2001-2017. Planespot.com  All rights reserved. maintainer